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the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by the legitimate was a blow or, the person who legitimately is motivated to disclose some kind of wrongdoing. i once asked about something that we hear a lot in cases about discovery in civil lawsuits. not so much. the idea that, perhaps, something is government conduct is arguably unlawful in some respects,
our presenting event sponsor, the law firm of hush blackwell, and our media sponsors, ksdk news channel 5, st. louis public radio, and the st. louis business journal. ksdk is televising this broadcast live to its affiliates across missouri. st. louis public radio is affils across missouri. st. louis public radio is doing the same. the broadcasts is also been streamed live on ksdk.com and stlpublicradio.org. we also invite you to take part on social media on twitter. finally, our appreciation to the city police and fire department, as well as the school district of clayton for hosting tonight's event. before we begin, i'd like to review the debate format. each candidate will give a 3- minute opening statement and a 3-minute closing statement. next, our panel will ask questions of both candidates. both candidates will answer the same question and have one and half minute to do so. rebuttals will be at the discretion of the moderator and will have 45 seconds. after that, we will take questions from the audience, who received an index card as they entered the auditorium. they were a
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
. >> it'd be pretty difficult for him to actually repeal the healthcare law within 24 hours. he would need to go to congress and we'd still have to wait and see if republicans are in control of the senate or the house. >> sarah kliff covers healthcare issues for the washington post. while she says democratic control of the senate would throw a wrench into romney's plans, there are immediate steps a romney administration could take to start to undo obama's signature piece of legislation. >> one option the romney administration could pursue is not offering funds to the various departments that are supposed to implement the health care law. that could really slow down and make it very difficult to implement the law even if it were left standing as a law. >> for all the rancor surrounding the legislation, the percentage of americans with medical insurance has barely budged since the law was passed 31 months ago. according to the census an estimated 84.3 percent of americans had medical insurance last year compared to 83.7 percent the year before. because of the legislation, a few million young
training from here in the united states. i lead a rule law forum back to the states last january. all aimed at assisting the judicial system. as the saudi system has moved out on a number of areas, we have supported their efforts. in yemen, saudi arabia played a significant role in brokering a gcc led political transition agreement. and continue to provide a leadership role in the friends of yemen and support of the government. there have been the last few years a trend toward multilateralism. i say that with some reservation because certainly the gcc and the arab league have been active in the last two years in ways not previously seen. most recently, saudi arabia has pushed the idea of a gcc union patterned after the eu. for secretary clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in parti
forward with regulations that are inconsistent with the underlying law, and advisory opinions that are inconsistent, and implementations that is inconsistent with what congress intended and with what the law is. the work requirements for welfare cross it was very clear. i was a lead sponsor of the bill and there was no waiver capability for the report -- the work requirement, and he did it. immigration and others -- you have a bunch of issues. and what that does is create uncertainty. if the government can go and do what they want regardless of what the lot is -- what the law expert, and the government says coppola -- what the lot is, and the government says, and going to do it and go ahead and sue me. that is as much of the problem as the volume we have seen. the cost of the regulation is inconsistent with the underlying law that was passed by congress, or never even contemplated by congress. co2 is a toxic substance. i cannot imagine anyone who voted for the clean air act who would have suggested that was something that was covered under the definition when they passed that
, and we need to think about the risks they may post to other people. and lastly under current law before turn to part about health reform, i just would be remiss if i didn't point out in terms of access that there are some eligibility gaps in the snap. now be for some legal immigrants and unemployed childless adults who face a three-month time in a three month time limit has been suspended in most parts of the country during the recession. but basically if you don't have shown and you're between 18-29 you can only get food stamps, snap for three months. over a three-year period. if you're not working. and so that time limit will be coming back in the coming years and is really a serious weakness in the program. and we can talk, if people want to comment about what some of the other changes that are legislative the under consideration in coming, in congress right now. if folks want to go there but i'm going to skip that. most of what i want to talk about, looking forward to the next few years, what is the future of the snap access, and we were think as i said, about packaging step with ot
-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to film through offshore companies and then inflate the cost to reduce taxes owed. the former prime minister will remain free until italy's appeal system is exhausted, a process that could be quite lengthy. >> for more on this case, we will tend to john hooper in rome. berlusconi was sentenced to four years but apparently will only serve one year if at all. how likely is it he will serve any time? >> very unlikely indeed. the italian judicial system is one in which trials take a long time, and there are also very generous statutes of limitation that time out cases often before they have completed the process, which involved two appeals. so there is a long way to run. it is almost certain that sometime late 2013, early
common ground to make sure our tax laws are more competitive and simple. if we do that, i think we will send a message to the world america is open for business again. >> i think what the audience sought is he was asked a question about his senate record and he was talking about being governor. he is running for reelection to the united states senate. he had a fiscal irresponsibility. george came into the united states senate with historic surpluses. we were in great shape. by the time he left, we had massive deficits. he voted to increase the debt by $16,000 every second he was in the senate. he expanded medicare, which was good, but he did not pay for it. he was part of a senate and a house that declared two wars but did not pay for the wars and instead put them on the credit card for our kids to pay. he made a massive tax cuts to health -- to help the wealthy. he did not pay for them. we went from surplus to deficit. he voted four times to raise his own pay. he voted four times to raise the debt with it, he voted for 52,000 earmarks that totaled $121 billion. even george had to
on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the state of new hampshire. is it possible that there could be a recount in this state and what are the rules for that? guest: we have specific rules for the state. we have a fine secretary of state, bill gardner, quite experienced in this. he's the person who has been the keeper of the flame for the new hampshire primary. we had a famous account here in the late '70's with senator john durken who recently passed away. frankly, i don't see it coming down to that. we will see what happens on tuesday. i think other states may be more likely to have a recount and new hampshire. host: do you have voter id laws? guest: yes, and there's some controversy. the legislature passed a voter -- a new voter law that required people to swear that if there were going to vote in a certain town that they would pay their taxes and their registration fees for their cars in that town, etc. this was appealed and the state supreme court has put that on hold. right now some of our voters are slightly confused about those issues going into tuesday. ho
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
rate of any country in the world. 2.3 million people. half of what we spend on law enforcement, the court and the prisons is drug related, and to what end. look, this is not about advocating drug use. 50% of kids graduating from high school have smoked marijuana. that's an issue that belongs with families, not in the criminal justice system. [applause] >> anybody have any rebuttal? >> i have to make my statements first, and then my rebuttal. so as a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years, i can say with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to o
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
of issues with law enforcement, particularly the issue of creating a funnel for narcotics trafficking within 5 miles of the new mexico border. there are hundreds of new mexicans who have signed petitions that saying, please do not do this. you are ignoring them. you are not going to find a solution that way. >> let's move on to the next question. >> in 2007, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators reached a tentative compromise on immigration reform. but even with president bush's support, the compromise collapsed. most agree we need immigration reform. what reforms do yoou support? and how would you get the senate to approve immigration reform when such a bipartisan group could not? representative wilson. >> it is separate from border security. the united states has to have effective control of our borders. the number of people crossing the border illegally has gone down because of the resources that we put in there since 2005. that is a good thing. the people who are still crossing tend to be heavily armed narco traffickers and human traffickers. it's very dangerous. with respect to immigratio
nobody speaks about the intelligence blunder the republicans did that put us in a war with raq, law 2000 american soldiers, and their answer was they had poor intelligence. secondly, my question is, why should anybody believe that governor romney would be good at creating jobs what he was 48 in job guest: well, i'll take the question first. governor romney in the middle oh f a tough economy created almost 50,000 new jobs in massachusetts. let's remember. >> on "washington journal" tomorrow morning we'll look at virge. >> now we'll go to jacksonville florida where mitt romney is to speak shortly. he is with jeb bush. >> you ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries"? this is an important election. this an election about what the future of america is going to be. is our future going to be more debt and more regulation and more taxes? sor our future going to be in less taxes, less regulations and. nibble mitt romney. he's the right candidate at the right time to be
th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years because what you have to pay will be determined by what you are making, not the other way around. [cheers and applause] believe it or not, over 10 years this cost you $6 billion less than the old system. -- $60 billion less than the old system. the president and congress allocated at $60 million to increasing the pell grants every year for a decade to keep up with inflation and maintaining the tuition tax credits for middle-class families to help pay their kids way through college. this is unbelievable. here is wh
and accomplish was to change campaign finance law. something like the disclose act, which -- the system is broken. it is broken like a broken arm. it is not terminal, but we need to fix it and i would like to be part of that. there is way too much money in politics. when i see these ads on tv i am seeing them for the first time. these are not organizations that i am connected with. in terms of the advertising. >> mr. king, i have a question about taxes. let's say in 2013 you are appointed tax czar to establish u.s. tax policy. what would you do? >> i have opposed the czars, but it would be a tempting appointment -- the first thing i would do is make the bush tax brackets permanent so there is long-term predictability. then i would go to work to sell to the public the idea that, as ronald reagan said, the federal government has the first lien on productivity and punishes production -- we remove all taxes off of production and put them on consumption. we can transform this policy. that is a piece i have gone around and talked about. i've talked about it each year i have been in congress. i asked mr
are divided as a country. we are almost evenly divided on the issue of abortion. i do not think the law is changing anytime soon. the way you change things is change the hearts and minds of the population. we are worlds away from that. we get bogged down in talking about exceptions to rules. we get uaway from the primary question we are worried about. that is 23 people -- 23 million people out of work. i am socially conservative, but i talk about economic issues because i think it is important to the country and what unites a lot of us. it does not divide us. talking about the debt and the budget and unemployment are things that everyone is concerned with and everybody should be on the same side of those issues. >> let me go back to susan ferrechio comment about the races you are supporting. can todd akin win the missouri senate race? >> i think he can win. missouri voted 70% in a referendum against obamacare. i think the president has stopped campaigning there. i did not think many people are listing it as a battleground state. missouri has become more conservative and more republican.
of the law school at marquette university. i'm the host of the statewide public affairs program. the rules are simple. the candidates have jaundice for a conversation about the level of government in our lives. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates can talk to one another but i will be managing the time is spent on a particular topic. we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have a closing statement along with the 90 statements. -- 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin. we will begin with night -- tonight with tammy baldwin. i will ask the both the same kind of question. about your portrayal in this campaign. you haven't portrayed as an extreme liberal -- have been portrayed as an extreme liberal. the national journal said you have either one of the most were the most liberal voting records in the house. the late george mcgovern said he was a proud liberal. what are you willing to embrace that definition? >> in wisconsin, we have a tradition of progressivism. it means something here. sometimes the words of liberal a
mali. they've destroyed shrines, impose period sahria law and stoned people who come in their wake. now, mali was once considered one of the few stable democracies in africa, and mali's capital would normally have been able to counteract these insurgents. but the government tripped up this year. a coup took place in march. in the aftermath, soldiers deserted the army. there are reports many even sold their equipment for money. so mali is essentially defenseless. last month the interim president called on the security council to help. seems increasingly likely there will be some military intervention. already a regional group called ecowas, economic community of west african states, is pulling together a small army. france is leading the calls for action. it has submitted a proposal to the u.n. for malayan soldier to be trained by the european union. those soldiers will then join a few thousand ecowas troops to retake northern mali. remember, mali was a french colony until 1960. france continues to have trade interests in the region. what about washington's role? haven't our leaders prom
the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. in the final presidential debate, the one on foreign policy, it was interesting to note the countries that got a mention. iran was cited 47 times, of course. israel, 34 times. and china, 32 times. it was also telling, there was only one mention each of europe and africa, and none at all of india. but i was struck by the amount of play one small country got. the one doesn't usually register on washington's foreign policy radar. >> mali -- >> mali -- >> with a gdp 1% of mexico. why mali? here's the story briefly. radical islamist groups have taken control of as much as 2/3 of mali's territory, including the historic city of timbuktu. among these groups is al qaeda and the islamic maghreb, said to have been involved in last month's attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. together the radical outfits have tormented mali. they've destroyed shrines, imposed sharia law and stoned people who come in their wake. now, mali was once considere
, which is pursuing a nuclear weapons program contrary to international norms and laws. so when the u.s. is negotiating with iran, i think we should keep that in mind. and i don't think the united states officially wants to implode the iranian government or have the iranian government collapse or have the iranian government capitulate. i think our goals are pretty well defined. we want iran to stop enriching uranium to a higher degree that can be used for a nuclear weapon, period. and i think that's very achievable. part of the problem is iran's supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei, like ken said, is inflexible. he's even more inflexible than khomeini was, and there are indications that his advisers including within the revolutionary guards are not happy with him. he's been criticized even publicly for his decisions and style of rule. and when we look at the islamic republic, this is not a system that's different than the other authoritarian regimes that have been overthrown in the middle east. it is corrupt, it denies its people basic rights, social, political and economic, it discrimi
in the -- laws in the state of new hampshire. what are the rules for that? guest: we have a fine secretary of state who is quite experienced in this. he is the person who has been a keeper of the flame for the new hampshire primary. we had a famous 3 count here in the late 1970's with senator john durkin, who recently passed away. i do not see it coming down to that. we will see what happens on tuesday. other states may be more likely to have a recount then you hampshire. host: what about voter i.d. laws? do you have them? guest: >> there is some controversy. the legislature passed a voter law that require people to swear that they would, if they were going to vote in a certain town, that they would pay taxes and registration fees for their cars in the town. this was appealed and the state supreme court has put that on hold. right now, some of our voters are confused about those issues going into tuesday. host: neil levesque is the executive director at st. anselm college cost new hampshire institute of politics. if you would like to join the conversation, the numbers are on your screen. a
approach than some of those around him like his late brother in law or his brother, but it really doesn't matter. it's in material. we see the situation. we know what it is. and it's going to continue. i think increasingly there's a consensus at what the situation is in syria and what some of the pitfalls are. you know, i think there's much more realism now than there was a year ago. about what's going on in that country. and much more sober assessment on the part of u.s. officials and others as to what can and can't be done. certainly, being a former diplomat, you would not be surprised to find out that a belief that this, we should be leaning a diplomatic effort. but i'm not a fan of those who want to blame america for the situation, or blame american action up to now for the terrible deterioration that has taken place. remember jeane kirkpatrick at a republican convention, i think we nominating ronald reagan, excoriating the democrats are also the blaming america first. i would say to our arab friends, you have to be careful, too, because first we were to present in the middle east,
of the audience, a committee of byu faculty members as well as the byu law school reviewed the questions. they selected those addressing important utah national issues. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. howell will have the first question of the debate, for subsequent questions we'll alternate which candidate answers first. each candidate will then have a minute to answer the question, and both will have an additional 30 seconds for rebuttal. if i determine that a follow-up question is appropriate, each will have 30 seconds to respond to my follow-up yes. the first question is from joseph haywood, a student here at brigham young university. joseph? >> regarding health care, what responsibilities, if any, do you believe rest with state and local governments, and what responsibilities, if any, lay with the federal government? howell: thank you, joseph. you know, health care is a fifth of our gdp right now. i serve on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have afforda
" foundation of modern international law, which bars the threat or use of force in international affairs. there are two rogue states, the nine states and israel, which for him or which regard the charter and international law is just a boring relevance, so do what they like. and that is accepted. these are not just words. there is an ongoing war including terrorism, assassination of nuclear scientists, economic war, u.s. threats which have cut iran out of the international financial system. western military analysts identify what they call weapons of finance as acts of war, the justify violent responses when they are directed against us, that is. the united states is openly carrying out extensive cyber war against iran that is praised. the pentagon regards cyber war as equivalent to an armed attack, which justifies military response. but of course, that is when it is directed against us. the leading liberal figure in the state department, state department legal adviser, says cyber war is an act of war if it results in significant destruction. like the attacks against iranian nuclear faci
law in this country because th judicial process is so slow. over there, that is ridiculous. honestly, power corrupts. look at our own country. the president of the united states. secretary of treasury did not pay his taxes. [talking over each other] >> forgot to pay the taxes on a private plane. and telling you. it's all about the scandal and the tax is right here. >> i don't know. it seems like somethi i could see appening i rhode island, t that's about it. melissa: other problems. another case. but we won't. melissa: all kinds of stuff. this next one is really crazy. a guy wanting to get rid of extra step before moving bus ads on craigslist for every yard sale. people showed up before the start time. guess what happened? broke into his house and just clean the place out. it was ransacked, and now look at this. look at this. that is all that is left. the goblins himself. agassi did not worthy and very well. >> this story. can you imagine? melissa: he said everything must go. >> a ticket literally. >> and if you have never had a wry sale, gr up in the midwest. people show up at your
of society along with rule of law, along with a stable economy, along with writing business. >> i have an answer that is probably quite controversial and it doesn't have to do with the military%, but it has to do with the policy on how the u.s. controls the development of medical devices and drugs. it has become so problematic that a fireman and medical technology developers are now going to other countries to do the clinical trials in the work necessary to prove that their devices work successfully in human. this is a very backwards way of promoting national security in the context of preventing people from disease and injury through advanced technology. budget is important i think that if our industry and the health sector is turning to other countries that we maintain strong relationships with those countries and make sure there's a handshake there between our medical professionals and their medical professionals, that were not just experimenting on their populations. i think that is an important unintended consequence of our current policy. >> if i could pile on to your question. i
to ensure hospitals and law enforcement offices are able to stay up and running as their of their responding. we will continue to push as hard as we can to make sure power is up throughout the region, and obviously this is mostly a local responsibility, and the private utilities are going to have to lean forward, but we're doing everything we can to provide additional resources so that we can expedite getting power up and running in many of the communities. there are places around newark, new jersey, where you have 80 percent of the people without power. my instruction has been do not figure out why we cannot do something. i want to figure out how we do something. i want you to cut through red tape, bureaucracy. there is no excuse for inaction at this point. i want every agency to lean forward and make sure we are getting the resources where they are needed as quickly as possible. so i want to repeat, my message to the federal government, no bureaucracy, no red tape. dear resources where they are needed as fast as possible, as hard as possible, and for the duration, because the recovery proc
? if you have laws, regulations won't stop it, laws won't stop it, it is just vigilant. vigilance about citizens protection and the way that they need to comment having law enforcement in the right places in order to best leverage a limited number of resources. and i think we really need to get beyond the conversation cannot wait for the next 9/11 to come together and get something viable and practical that we can do. >> is there anything other than this that you suggest, samantha? >> yes, i'm not really going to talk about it, they will tell you about whether or not it works. but i think that every agency has seen tremendous assets going. and we find out about it. what we find out about it from the outside. we find out about it a lot of ways. i think that our rule is to make sure that the data and the damages assessed as much as we can. we make sure that we protect everything that we can. nasa has said that we don't want to give away certain things. everyone who says we don't want this, they just don't know. but agencies, just like we talked about, we are not going to go and just give
as a journalist and served as a fellow in law and public policy here at the university. the rules for tonight's discussion are simple. we have asked candidates to join us for conversation about the role of government in our lives and the direction of our country. we have asked them to answer a question as directly and concisely as possible. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates may talk to one another, but i will be managing the time we spend on a particular topic and we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have an opposing statement along with 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin to see who got the first question. if we begin tonight with congresswoman tammy baldwin. good to have you. >> thank you. >> it's about your portrayal in the campaign. you have been portrayed in this campaign as an extreme liberal. that's what we see in the advertising and people have been bombarded by the apsa in the race. the national journal, a respected publication, said that you have either one of the most or the most liberal voting rec
coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> it nay hamay have been the most pointless use of off the record. obama spanked for some saying his editorials couldn't be published. then they caved expect put it on the record in a routine issue. now they support mitt romney for president. should the authors have talked to him in the first place in the last two weeks of the campaign? >> i think you'll see a lost of people doing that now. no, why, why bother? you can get access in this age of social media to things snantdly. why do you need to talk to somebody off the record? you can get the stuff that you need. >> editor
that law. is a great question. something journalists and tijuana struggle with all the time with the rise of social media and websites a lot of you have heard about -- including one which started out as a compendium of information about basically narco turf wars, shootings in the streets, the headings. it started off as a visual wallpaper and has since become interesting, more sophisticated, and is beginning to write articles and put -- and the editor is anonymous, but they are beginning to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being a kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity. the journalist would say, that is great that the information is there, and the kind of iphone video or man on the street, so called man on the street video of any event can be uploaded quickly, but who is providing context and analysis? not that we always need to rely on experts, but if you are writing for a weekly, that really gives you a totally different approach. you can provide context, provide perspective, in a way that yo
in this health care law, we need to keep the good and get rid of the bad. if somebody from the republican side actually extended that hand and said let's fix this, let's get of the rest of the bad stuff and there would have been a whole lot a better dialogue and we would have been better had. this is far too poor to publicize, and i think for the last t done via zero election cycles there has been an unwillingness to sit down and solve the problem because they would rather use it as a political wedge issue to get elected, and that is almost too cynical, and is one of the reasons i am in this race because i'm tired of the cynicism, the partisanship, this is way too important. we need to everything we can. >> it needs to be repealed. here's something that's people in north dakota it did not want, and yet it was shocked to in the middle of the night, and rather than get input from people, my opponent went around the state with rows to campaign for it and push for it rather than get input. the runaway the process works is we need to have open committees come bring everybody together, and work out
election law there's nothing that calls for personal financial disclosure which both of us felt that the issues both you and your husband are sector millions. i fully filled out those forms in full compliance. and i went a step further but i three years of my tax returns. it was published that take 30% of my income in taxes. i have no loopholes. i've no for an account. it's my small businesses where i make my money. you make your money working for the government are doing your money -- you and your husband make almost three and $50,000 a year. my income is earned by having companies that employ workers in this a. i think the bigger question is, you've got something hidden in your to secret family trusts that you won't disclose and you haven't disclosed. so ms. hochul, ladies and those to secret family trusts ask because i've a feeling they may be something you don't want the voters to know. hochul: you've got to be kidding me. give it a pretty big you're the one who has refused to put your personal taxes on one because you said the voters basically were not smart enough to under
, the medical loss ratio. the affordable care act act is a tax law. there are 24 new taxes. we find out the individual mandate is a tax. we have financial transaction taxes, medical device texas -- these things were created for people to be able to earmark their income and it is now taxed. you also get 16,000 to irs agents that will be monitoring electronic records. that is not how we repair health care. i wrote an op-ed piece talking about free market solutions. one of those key things is tort reform. talk to any doctor, catastrophic litigation is their biggest problem. >> congressman, you're not being honest. when you voted for the ryan plan, you voted to take $716 billion. i've never been in congress. let's be clear. this is future savings under the democratic version. they found waste, inefficiency and fraud, over-payments to insurance companies they are getting back to seniors through annual treating and closing down the hall. the difference here is -- closing the doughnut hole. the difference here is paul ryan top the seven and $16 billion was a good idea -- thought the $716 billi
law makers to reach a bipartisan agreement to bring down the nation's debt level. they're pushing the controversialal methods raising tax revenue. >> there needs to be compromise and compromise not being a dirty word, but rather being synonymous with governing. yes, i recognize my taxes are going up. i haven't developed a table that says i'll be willing to pay this much more if you're willing to cut this much more. who knows where that's going to go. but i would say most companies, most people expect that they're probably going to have to pay more. >> an increasing number of ceos are going on record that they're willing to pay more in taxes to avert the so-called fiscal cliff as part of a comprehensive plan. if congress fails to act by january, it will trigger $600 billion of cuts. businesses not certain of what lies ahead have been reluctant to increase pay rolls. >> we stop hiring externally. as people leave their positions, we don't fill those jobs. as you look at exapt expenditures, we start to slow down our spending. and you see most companies doing that now because when you
campaign finance law. something like the disclose act, which -- the system is broken. it is broken like a broken arm. it is not terminal, but we need to fix it and i would like to be part of that. there is way too much money in politics. when i see these ads on tv i am seeing them for the first time. these are not organizations that i am connected with. in terms of the advertising. >> mr. king, i have a question about taxes. let's say in 2013 you are appointed tax czar to establish u.s. tax policy. what would you do? >> i have opposed the czars, but it would be a tempting appointment -- the first thing i would do is make the bush tax brackets permanent so there is long-term predictability. then i would go to work to sell to the public the idea that, as ronald reagan said, the federal government has the first lien on productivity and punishes production -- we remove all taxes off of production and put them on consumption. we can transform this policy. that is a piece i have gone around and talked about. i've talked about it each year i have been in congress. i asked mrs. vilsack to debat
on that. in addition, we will the law that -- we will build on that, developing regional and cultural expertise that will allow them to be effective in the region they are going to. one of the problems we have had in the last 10 years was are complete lack of knowledge about iraq and afghanistan where we went in back in 2002 and in 2003. we cannot allow that to happen again. we have to be much more aggressive and understanding and viewing things from the eyes of those in the conflict. we have to do better of that. >> one final question. we will give you the opportunity for a final comment. >> you mentioned the hormiz interface with the population a, as well as our -- the army's interface with the population, as well as the attraction with it. how has don't ask, don't tell don? has that had any problems with recruiting? >> we are a year into this now, so i don't want to overstate it, but it could not have gone any better than it has gone in my opinion. i think it has to do, first, with how we rolled it out, how we briefed it, and frankly cannot we underestimated our -- frankly, we unde
there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal government. there's actually a major law signed this summer, the bigger waters flood insurance reform act. it was designed to improve the program. it removes a lot of subsidies that the government has put into the program. the goal of it is to make the program were actuarially found him a of private insurance program. >> host: "the wall street journal" this morning, the editorial, taxpayer jay louche. for those who don't have the 1960s era program offers subsidized insurance of the bull market raced to homeowners and businesses in flood prone areas and pays private insurers to administer the policy at the government accountability office put it zero so delicately lasher the program has a history of significant management challenges, including lax internal controls and outdated maps. the program has crowded out by the competition for decades, which leaves taxpayers on the hook when disaster strikes. that's "the wall street journal." "washington journal" if i could respond, i represent the independent insurance brokers of america. we
was a major law that was signed this, the flood insurance reform act. it was designed to improve the program. it removes a lot of the subsidies that the government put into the program. the goal is to make the program more actuarially sound and more like a private insurance plan. >> host: in "the wall street journal", there was an editorial this one. the 1960s program offered subsidized insurance program to homeowners and businesses in flood prone areas and pays private insurers to admin administer the policy. at the government accountability office, they put it that the program has a history of significant management challenges, including internal controls and outdated maps. the program has crowded out private competition for decades, which means taxpayers on the hook when disaster strikes. >> guest: if i could respond. i represent the independent insurance agents of america. we like working with the private market firms and are trusted company partners. we would love to sell credit insurance and private flood insurance on the open market. the simple fact is that it doesn't exist. in the 19
leaving passengers on more than 15,000 flights stranded? my mother-in-law was one of them. she is trapped overseas. that kind of cuts both ways. look at picture of jetblue tarmac in laguardia airport. we know the storm could end up costing billions of dollars in damages. what about the travel industry this when will marined travelers get home. we have an expert at travel skills group, chris mcginnis. thanks very much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> sure thing. melissa: i even saw one estimate that said 18,000 flights. it just keeps climbing. is this a loss because, you know those flights didn't happen. people that were somewhere have to get home. but people who never left are, they're not going on those trips. >> yeah. they're displaced peel. there is displaced people all over the whole country right now. 7,000 cancellations yesterday. about 7,000 today. luckily looking into tomorrow we're looking about a a thousand cancellations. it is coming around pretty quickly. we still have all four new york airports shut down right now. there is not a good idea when they will be coming back up
a president in a motorcade. takes a lot of law enforcement resources. there are a lot of streets may or may not be closed down. here in pennsylvania we would probably be able to get him around. we don't have the devastation to the extent that the people in new jersey and people in new york have. i'm sure that is where the president feel he needs to be and should job what do you think of how effusive governor christie has been of the president? it left a lot of people scratching their heads. was it surprising to you? >> well i haven't seen it. i've been out on the road. so i, i haven't had a chance to receive the news very much. but i will say this, governor christie is a very honest man. he is giving you his opinion. i was asked today about what i thought about the work of fema. i have to tell you fema has done a great job with our pennsylvania emergency management agency. very pleased at their responsiveness. i'm pleased at their responsiveness from the president and telling us they will be there to help us. so i think if, christie is talking that way he has an honest feeling about that. m
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